Thought for the month

“Resentment is like drinking poison and waiting for the other person to die.” Saint Augustine of Hippo (354 – 430 AD).

Friday, 15 February 2019

Some people believe that the earth is flat, others that the Apollo moon landings were faked. The Flat Earth International Conference is being held in November. Two days with an exhibition! The conference website promotes a Flat Earth cruise in 2020, clearly unconcerned that for many years marine navigation has relied upon a more spherical model of the earth. Can we dismiss these people and ideas as irrelevant or are there wider lessons to be learnt that impact more serious issues? Bernstein's concept of an idiot culture maybe a bit harsh but too often scientific rationale is lost, and sometimes poorly communicated, in a plethora of opinions. Being right is not the same as being effective.

Wednesday, 13 February 2019

One ring to rule them all?
CERN has published, in four volumes, its ideas for a £20bn successor to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), given the working name of Future Circular Collider. The circular tunnel would have a circumference of about 100 kilometres (62 miles), almost four times longer than the current LHC. Undoubtedly it would be a tool for progressing particle physics and our knowledge of matter and dark matter. However will politicians and those in other scientific areas think it precious?

Monday, 11 February 2019

PVD Products, Inc.
Customer Application Spotlight: Driving adoption of unique MAPLE deposition techniques at Duke University. 

Friday, 8 February 2019

k-Space Associates, Inc.
Spectral reflectance tool released for VCSEL growth and other applications - contact us for more details.
Notes on the meetings of the Royal Society taken by Hans Sloane between 1668 and 1711 are now available as digital resources.

Wednesday, 6 February 2019

219 inch TVs and smart diapers were only two of the items on display at last month’s CES.

Friday, 1 February 2019

The International Statistic of 2018 is 90.5%. This is the proportion of plastic waste that has never been recycled, estimated at 6,300 million metric tonnes.

Wednesday, 30 January 2019

Periodic celebration
The United Nations has proclaimed 2019 as the International Year of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements being 150 years since Mendeleev produced the first version. An 1885 version, printed in Vienna by Verlag v Lenoir & Forster, has been found at the University of St Andrews. It was bought by mail order in 1888 for three German goldmarks, the equivalent of about €20/$22/£17 today.

Wednesday, 23 January 2019

PVD Products, Inc.
It’s All in the Delivery: The Evolution of Combinatorial Deposition 
k-Space Associates, Inc.
Template analysis now available for the kSA BandiT substrate temperature monitor 

Monday, 21 January 2019

Thermo Scientific
New Apps Note: Composition, coverage and band gap analysis of ALD-grown ultra thin films

Friday, 18 January 2019

A National Academies of Sciences report considers that it is still too early to be able to predict the time horizon for a scalable quantum computer. 

Wednesday, 16 January 2019

During 2018 we often searched about the World Cup, Agent immobilier, Daniel Küblböck and Hurricane Florence.

Monday, 14 January 2019

A 64-year-old letter by Albert Einstein, known as the “God letter” because of its ruminations on formal religion, sold for almost $2.9 million in Manhattan last month.

Friday, 11 January 2019

The cost of counting
Measurement is an integral part of science and the search for understanding the world. In business we often say you cannot manage what you cannot measure. An interesting essay on measuring things does not directly contradict these thoughts but reminds us to be objective in deciding what we measure. Remember that not everything that counts can be counted, and not everything that can be counted counts.

Wednesday, 9 January 2019

Congratulations to Professor Peter Cumpson of receiving the Rivière Prize from UKSAF. Amongst Peter's contributions in the field of XPS have been the development of Angle Resolved XPS quantification and improved spectrometer calibration.
Social science?
Aimed at tackling scientific misconduct, the Chinese government has expanded its controversial social credit system to include infractions made by research scientists. According to a report in Nature News researchers in China who commit scientific misconduct could soon be prevented from getting a bank loan, running a company or applying for a public-service job. This may, in part, be a reaction to He Jiankui’s gene editing babies experiments

Tuesday, 3 July 2018

Latvian growth

Latvia moves from 28th to 1st in a ranking for people born from 1896 to 1996

Monday, 2 July 2018

Four legged friend

Boston Dynamics will start selling its dog-like SpotMini robot in 2019

Friday, 29 June 2018

Feynman’s thoughts

In honour of his centennial, the Top 10 Feynman quotations.

Wednesday, 27 June 2018

Time for lutetium


Neglected atom has top properties for atomic clocks.

Monday, 25 June 2018

Will the tea bag survive?


Scientists have used a powerful X-ray laser to heat water from room temperature to 100,000 degrees Celsius in less than a tenth of a picosecond.

Wednesday, 20 June 2018

Flipping panic

Earth’s magnetic field is NOT about to reverse

Wednesday, 13 June 2018

Si wafer shipment

Reaching their highest recorded quarterly level ever, worldwide silicon wafer area shipments were 3,084 million square inches during the first quarter of 2018.