Nous sommes tous parisiens, une fois de plus

Wednesday, 25 November 2015

Wednesday, 18 November 2015

Monday, 16 November 2015

No proper time

Thought for the month

“Doubt is the father of invention.” Ambrose Bierce, US Journalist (1842 – 1914).

Friday, 13 November 2015

Ultrafast system to be implanted in Leeds

University of Leeds agrees $1.4M contract with PVD Products, Inc. to supply an Ultrafast Laser Plasma Implantation System to scale up the technique developed in their existing PLD system, delivered by PVD Products in 2008. ULPI uses high-powered, short-pulsed lasers to generate highly energetic plasma from a target material that is then implanted into another material. The university has spun-out the company Ultramatis to capitalize on the commercial developments of this powerful technique.

As black as a beetle

Tuesday, 10 November 2015

Thermo Scientific XPS system selected by Cardiff University

To fulfill their requirements for a multi-user high performance X-ray photoelectron spectrometer, Cardiff University have selected a Thermo Scientific XPS system fitted with the MAGCIS combined monatomic and gas cluster ion source.

Friday, 6 November 2015

In Brief

Nominations are sought for the Young Scientist Prizes in Semiconductor Physics awarded by IUPAP Commission on Semiconductors. The deadline is December 31, 2015. An analysis predicts the availability of self-driving cars by 2022 but at a price premium of $10,000. A group headed by the University of California have fabricated Ge/molybdenum disulphide FETs.

Wednesday, 4 November 2015

Lots of bits

Approximately 100 billion optical components would be required to make a practical, fault tolerant, quantum computer that uses light to process information. This is the conclusion of a recent publication which calculated that the number of components for a photon-based computer would be five orders of magnitude larger than for a matter-based processor.

Monday, 2 November 2015

Crowdsourced analysis

A paper in Nature illustrates the benefits of the pre-publication sharing of data and analysis methodologies with others. 29 teams of researchers were asked to answer the same research question with the same data set. Teams approached the data with a wide array of analytical techniques, and obtained varied results. This was then followed by rounds of peer feedback, technique refinement and discussion to see whether the initial variety could be channelled into a joint conclusion. The overall group consensus was much more tentative than would be expected from a single-team analysis.

Friday, 30 October 2015

Wednesday, 28 October 2015

Monday, 26 October 2015

Friday, 23 October 2015

Wednesday, 21 October 2015

Monday, 19 October 2015

Wednesday, 14 October 2015

Test your science

Try the Pew Research science knowledge test. Of the original 3278 people tested the average score was 8 out of 12 correct.

Monday, 12 October 2015

Researchers at Aalto University and VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland have succeeded in developing a method which helps to improve the relative uncertainty in measuring the luminous efficacy of LEDs.

Friday, 9 October 2015

In Brief

Massachusetts Institute of Technology has retained the top spot in the QS World University Rankings with Harvard University coming second. However Stanford is top of the Reuters Top 100 World’s Most Innovative Universities Rankings.

Wednesday, 7 October 2015

Cool it

An interesting but simple piece of work at Stanford University is aimed at improving the efficiency of solar cells. The hotter they get, the less efficient they become at converting photons into electricity. The Stanford solution is to shunt away the heat. The concept is based on a thin, patterned silica material laid on top of a traditional solar cell. The material is transparent to the visible sunlight but absorbs and emits thermal radiation.